How Prenuptial Agreements Can Actually Lessen Stress for Some California Couples

Many couples debate whether to sign a prenuptial agreement. Unfortunately, the issue can lead to arguments or add tension to an otherwise blissful period in a couple’s relationship. In many cases, however, couples can benefit from entering into an equitable prenuptial contract. The document can actually relieve stress at every stage of the marriage, from before the wedding day, during the marriage and, if the marriage should fall apart, at the time of divorce.

How California Family Law Protects Grandparents’ Visitation Rights

After a divorce or separation, grandparents in California may be left wondering whether they will still be allowed to visit their grandchildren. There are certain guidelines in the state that deal with grandparents’ visitation rights. Below are a few things you should know about grandparents’ rights after a divorce. Grandparents can ask for visitation Parents can always try to arrange grandparent visitation without a court order. However, in some cases, parents attempt to bar grandparents from visiting their grandchildren, in which case the grandparent may wish to petition the court for visitation rights. Courts will not accept petitions for grandparent visitation if the parents are still married, unless there are extenuating circumstances such as a separation, the child is not living with either parent, the child has been adopted by a stepparent or one of the parents is incarcerated. Grandparents that choose to file for visitation rights must serve a copy of the petition to each parent, stepparent and anyone else with physical custody of the child. Courts will automatically send these cases to mediation and, if the parties are unable to settle the matter, the case will be heard by the court. A judge who oversees a grandparent visitation case will start by assuming grandparent visitation should not be allowed if both parents agree the grandparent should not have any visitation rights. However, grandparents can attempt to prove visitation is in the best interests of the child. In these cases, courts will consider:

Understanding How Collaborative Divorce Works

The divorce process can get very complicated very quickly. You must be able to manage all of your court dates, paperwork and various processes. Even straightforward divorces with little conflict will involve a lot of paperwork. The more conflict that exists in a divorce, the more likely it is you will need a full trial. Most people, however, have only a moderate level of conflict to deal with during their divorce. In these situations, a collaborative divorce could be the best path. In a collaborative divorce, the spouses work outside of the courtroom setting to negotiate the terms of their divorce. Doing so can help you save time and money while benefiting from an open and honest exchange of information in a more informal setting. You are able to decide how to handle any disputes that arise after your settlement and have much more control regarding your ability to negotiate a result that works for you.

What to Know About Relocating with Children After Divorce

If you are a divorced parent with custody and would like to move to a new location, whether it’s for work or any other purpose, there are some things you will need to consider regarding the other parent’s rights and your child’s best interests. First, check your Judgment to see if there are any restrictions on either parent’s ability to move the child outside a particular county or counties as restrictions are common in custody orders. In some cases, the custodial parent must provide the noncustodial parent with advance, written notice of his or her intent change the child’s residence to give that parent a chance to object with the court. Once the court receives the objection, it will schedule a hearing to address the issue. The court’s decision The court will consider the following factors when deciding if the move is in the child’s best interest:

Post-Divorce Financial Tips Everyone Should Know

Once your divorce is finalized, it is time for you to start over—in more ways than one. Financially, you are on your own for what is likely the first time in years, which means you need to revisit the financial planning strategies you use and reassess your financial picture. Below are a few tips for post-divorce financial planning that will help set you up for a stable future: Conduct a thorough review Take a close look at all your financial information, including income and expenses. Pay close attention to where your money is going each month and where you can afford to scale back. You should also review your assets, your tax situation, your credit and bank statements, your credit score and the state of any loans and other debts you currently have. If you have children, make sure you can are also planning ahead for their ever-changing needs such as driving, school expenses, braces, etc. Is the other parent obligated to help with these expenses, or will they be solely your responsibility? Think about the future of your career If you have been a stay-at-home parent, you will need to get back into the workforce, which could be a daunting task if you have been home for a while or if you need additional education or training to find gainful employment. How much training will you need? Will you need a degree for the job you’re seeking? What type of costs are associated with tuition and books? All these questions will influence your financial planning.

Social Media is Playing a Bigger Role in Divorce Cases

For many of us, social media is a near-constant presence in our lives. There are about 214 million active Facebook users in the United States alone, in addition to the millions of users on Instagram and Twitter. It’s perhaps not surprising that people’s social media activity has begun to have an impact on marriages and […]