New Research Indicates Co-Parenting is Best for Children

The toughest aspect of divorce for parents is deciding what is best for your children. Should you share custody? Or should one parent be the primary custodian, while the other enjoys substantial parenting time? The answer depends upon your particular situation and family. However, new research demonstrates why co-parenting may be the best option.

How California Family Law Protects Grandparents’ Visitation Rights

After a divorce or separation, grandparents in California may be left wondering whether they will still be allowed to visit their grandchildren. There are certain guidelines in the state that deal with grandparents’ visitation rights. Below are a few things you should know about grandparents’ rights after a divorce. Grandparents can ask for visitation Parents can always try to arrange grandparent visitation without a court order. However, in some cases, parents attempt to bar grandparents from visiting their grandchildren, in which case the grandparent may wish to petition the court for visitation rights. Courts will not accept petitions for grandparent visitation if the parents are still married, unless there are extenuating circumstances such as a separation, the child is not living with either parent, the child has been adopted by a stepparent or one of the parents is incarcerated. Grandparents that choose to file for visitation rights must serve a copy of the petition to each parent, stepparent and anyone else with physical custody of the child. Courts will automatically send these cases to mediation and, if the parties are unable to settle the matter, the case will be heard by the court. A judge who oversees a grandparent visitation case will start by assuming grandparent visitation should not be allowed if both parents agree the grandparent should not have any visitation rights. However, grandparents can attempt to prove visitation is in the best interests of the child. In these cases, courts will consider:

What to Know About Relocating with Children After Divorce

If you are a divorced parent with custody and would like to move to a new location, whether it’s for work or any other purpose, there are some things you will need to consider regarding the other parent’s rights and your child’s best interests. First, check your Judgment to see if there are any restrictions on either parent’s ability to move the child outside a particular county or counties as restrictions are common in custody orders. In some cases, the custodial parent must provide the noncustodial parent with advance, written notice of his or her intent change the child’s residence to give that parent a chance to object with the court. Once the court receives the objection, it will schedule a hearing to address the issue. The court’s decision The court will consider the following factors when deciding if the move is in the child’s best interest: